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Proposed Anarchist Federation Constitution - Draft by Jura Books, May 2015

Attached here is a draft of the proposed constitution for the Anarchist Federation Australia, drafted and approved by the Jura Collective in May 2015, based on earlier versions prepared by Melbourne Anarchist Club with input from other anarchist groups.

 

Background

To give some background and context, here is a summary of the current federation process, to the best of our knowledge. It’s based on a few different accounts, leading up to May 2015.

In 2007, some members of the Mutiny Collective called for expressions of interest in holding a conference to discuss the idea of an anarchist federation in Australia and/or NZ. In response to this initiative, the Melbourne Anarchist Club (MAC) organised a conference held during Easter 2008. About 60 people from across Australia attended and a broad range of views were expressed from opposition to enthusiasm. There were no delegates as such and each participant attended as an individual. While there were some differences in attitude to federation there was a significant amount of common ground. Following on from this, MAC decided in March 2013 to hold the Towards Federation Anarchist Conference in June 2013. It was proposed to invite groups (as opposed to individuals, although individuals were encouraged to attend as observers). A proposed constitution was presented for discussion and about 30 people attended including delegates from MAC, Libertarian Workers for a Self-managed Society (LWSS), and Melbourne Anarchist Communist Group (MACG). There were also observers from Anarchist Affinity and Jura. In January 2014, a follow up conference was held at Jura at which delegates from MAC, MACG and Jura attended (and an observer from a Canberra anarchist group). The draft constitution was discussed and suggestions for amending it were made. People from Jura agreed to do another re-draft of the proposed constitution.

In May 2015, Jura completed a re-draft of the constitution, which is now being circulated. Jura and MAC aim to have a meeting re the federation in June 2015. There will also be an open workshop about federation at the Sydney Anarchist Bookfair, on Saturday 13th June.

Over the last few years, there has also been a fair bit of online discussion about the federation, for example on Libcom and Facebook.

As we understand it, Jura, MAC and MACG are keen to form a federation this year, on the basis of the constitution we’ve been discussing and drafting and redrafting over the last few years. We would welcome other anarchist groups joining this federation if they agree with this constitution. However, we do not want to go back to stage one of the drafting process. (Although of course the constitution will be open to revision by the federation in the future.) We also intend for the federation to develop a ‘Statement of Shared Positions’ and a program of activities/projects, in the near future, which will give it more form and substance.

 

Groups that have been contacted about the federation at some point since March 2013:

AFA Perth - A meeting of of anarchists in Perth was held on 12 September 2014 and a decision was made to form a group with a view to federating in accordance with the proposed constitution (Jan 2014 version).

Anarchist Affinity (Melbourne) - Declined to send a delegate but did send an observer to the 2013 conference, a statement was made stating that while Anarchist Affinity supported the idea in principle, they were not ready to proceed and indicated that they would take no further part at this stage.

BAG (Brisbane) - Agreed to proceed on the basis of the proposed constitution in April 2013. Subsequently re-affirmed in January 2014.

Black Flag (Western Sydney) - Contacted in person by Jura people in 2015. Current position on the federation unknown.

Black Rose (Sydney) - Was initially contacted through what came to be discovered a defunct email account. Was contacted again in person by Jura people in 2014. Held a meeting to discuss the federation. Current position on the federation unknown.

Black Swan (Adelaide) - Has been sent the proposed constitution but no follow-up to date. Current position on the federation unknown.

Brisbane Solidarity Network - Has been sent the proposed constitution but no follow-up to date. Current position on the federation unknown.

Byron Bay Anarchists - Requested a copy of proposed constitution in 2014 but no response since. MAC unable to independently confirm the existence of the group.

Grupo de Melbourne - This is a group of the remaining Spanish exiles. A member came to MAC to express disappointment that they had not been invited to participate. Subsequently sent the January 2014 version of the proposed constitution by MAC. Discussed the proposed constitution over a weekend in May 2014 to develop a submission. Currently awaiting an English translation.

Jura (Sydney) - Had an observer participate in the June 2013 conference and hosted the January 2014 conference at which the proposed constitution was discussed. Discussed, amended and agreed on the May 2015 draft of the constitution. Jura is hosting a meeting of the federation (possibly the inaugral conference?) in June 2015.

Libertarian Workers for a Self-managed Society (Melbourne) - LWSS sent a submission and a delegate to June 2013 conference. Some of the LWSS submission was incorporated into the current proposed constitution. Since then, there has been no follow-up contact with LWSS. Current position on the federation unknown.

Melbourne Anarchist Club - Initiators of the current project to found an anarchist federation. Is in agreement with the January 2014 version of the proposed constitution on the proviso that there are at least three groups from at least two cities/locations and that the proposed federation be provisional for a period of 12 months to be subsequently confirmed or not. MAC is currently considering the May 2015 version of the proposed constitution.

Melbourne Anarchist Communist Group - Sent two delegates to June 2013 Conference and January 2014 conference. The MACG have expressed support and a desire to have the principles of 'the platform' incorporated into the constitution. Has participated in two joint meetings with the MAC to discuss the proposed constitution and have proposed some additions and modifications which were incorporated into the proposed constitution that was presented to the January 2014 conference.

 

 

Direct Action - Series 2, No. 3, 3 June 1928

Direct Action - Series 2, issue number 3, published 3 June 1928 p. 1, 4

Miscellaneous: 

Direct Action - Series 2, No. 2, 20 May 1928

Direct Action - Series 2, issue number 2, published 20 May 1928.

Miscellaneous: 

Direct Action - Series 2, No. 1, May 1928

Direct Action - Series 2, issue number 1, published May 1928.

Miscellaneous: 

How to Make Trouble and Influence People

How to Make Trouble and Influence People book

Jura is excited to stock the second edition of How to Make Trouble and Influence People - a brilliant book on Australia's radical past. Copies available for $35. Mail order available - just email us.
 
About the book:

This book reveals Australia’s radical past through more than 500 tales of Indigenous resistance, convict revolts and escapes, picket line hijinks, student occupations, creative direct action, street art, media pranks, urban interventions, squatting, blockades, banner drops, guerilla theatre, and billboard liberation. Twelve key Australian activists and pranksters are interviewed regarding their opposition to racism, nuclear power, war, economic exploitation, and religious conservatism via humour and creativity. Featuring more than 300 spectacular images How to Make Trouble and Influence People has been published in a second edition by PM Press. As this edition will mainly be distributed to audiences outside of Australia all of the listings from the first edition have been put in chronological order and introductions added for key periods in Australian history. It also features an additional 30 pages of new material.

Praise for the book:

“I noticed clear back on my first visit in ’83 that radical Aussies fighting back seem to be far more tenacious and creative than most Americans—Roxby Downs, that damned Franklin dam in Tasmania, Operation Titstorm, etc. A far better way to heat up the planet than your lovely mining companies. So keep up the good work! A prank a day keeps the dog leash away.”
—Jello Biafra

“A fascinating recovery of Australia’s neglected past and a worthy inspiration to today’s would-be troublemakers.”
—Sean Scalmer, author of Dissent Events: Protest, The Media and the Political Gimmick in Australia

“If you’ve ever thought of speaking out about an issue or have idly wondered what you could do to make the world a better place, this is the book for you! Fascinating interviews, quirky historical snippets and stunning photos chronicling all the Australians who have made a difference and who have done so with courage, audacity and a lot of humour! Keep it on your desk at work for all those moments when you need some inspiration, a bit of hope or just a good laugh.”
—Jill Sparrow, co-author Radical Melbourne 1 & 2

“Fascinating interviews with Australia’s best troublemakers make for a riotous scrapbook covering our radical history of revolts and resistance.”
—Rachel Power, Australian Education Union News

“McIntyre has amassed hundreds of tales alongside dramatic photographs in what is unashamedly a songbook for Australia’s future culture-jammers and mischief makers.”
—Katherine Wilson, The Age

Miscellaneous: 

Direct Action - No. 135, 18 Aug 1917

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