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Jura Books

Events at Jura

Jura is a radical social space. We put on gigs, films and discussions in order to build a counter-culture outside of (and in opposition to) the capitalist scene. We welcome like-minded groups to put on events in our space. Below is a selection of images from gigs and other Jura events over the last couple of years. Click on any image below to see the full size image or start the slide show (in Firefox). To move between images use the arrow keys or mouse over the images.

Jura's Special Opening Hours!!!

Jura will be open all week from the 17th til the 23rd of December 2018, so come on in an stock up on some anarchism and check out our new titles!

Monday: 2:00-7:00PM
Tuesday: 2:00-7:00PM
Wednesday: 2:00-7:00PM
Thursday: 2:00-7:00PM
Friday: 2:00-7:00PM
Saturday: 12:00-5:00PM
Sunday: 12:00-5:00PM

 

 

Jura Special Opening Hours!!!

 

Jura will be open all week from the 17th til the 23rd of December, so come on in an stock up on some anarchism and check out our new titles!

 

Monday: 2:00-7:00PM
Tuesday: 2:00-7:00PM
Wednesday: 2:00-7:00PM
Thursday: 2:00-7:00PM
Friday: 2:00-7:00PM
Saturday: 12:00-5:00PM
Sunday: 12:00-5:00PM

Meeting minutes 19th August 2018

Date: 19/08/2018

Opened: 2:15 pm

Present: Stuart, Leanne, Josh, Ish, Hugh, Gavin, James, Tarryn

 

Acknowledgement of Country:

Leanne

Self-introductions round the group.

Apologies from Tamara

Action Items: Membership processes, Roster, Next meeting, Newsletter, Sydney Uni stall, upcoming gigs

Reports - MABF (Ish), ASEN meeting

1. Membership processes

Jura: 

Jura Books: Forty Years and Now

Robert P. Barbagallo wrote this piece as part of an oral history project he worked on as a student at the University of Sydney. It is based on a series of interviews with Jura Collective members.


 

This piece will tell the story of the Jura Books anarchist collective as it was told to me through a series of five interviews I had conducted throughout May 2017. Five different members, both present and past, told me about their personal arrival to Jura, what they had experienced along the way, as well as their views on the Australian anarchist movement and their interpretation of anarchist ideas in general.

***

Amongst the busy lunch time sprawl at a Sydney University café, between the noisy chatter of students crammed at tables, I spoke to PS about Jura Books. PS had been a member of Jura Books during the 70s through to the early to mid-80s, a time he describes as “effervescently” active—just like the noise around us. We had been speaking for an hour or so. The lunch time sprawl had dulled. We maybe spoke for too long. “My car’s about to be booked, if it hasn’t been booked already.” (I’m deeply sorry if it was) But before he left he told me:

“One of the great things about Jura over the years is that it has been an opportunity for people to learn about anarchism, to learn about how to organise autonomously and work together in a collaborative way with rules, but with rules that are collectively decided and that are changed when they don’t work. They are not just rules for the sake of rules. Where [there are] people form very different backgrounds and generations…Sid, whose now one of the ‘old guys’ was one of the ‘young guys’. LM started when she was at university as an undergraduate. I started when I was an undergrad, now I’m an ‘old guy’ there. People learned to work in an anarchist way which in our society is not—maybe now is more available in kind of networked organisations.—But it’s also a way where people give without expecting material returns. There’s something very attractive about that kind of volunteer work.”

The Case for Anarchism or why Hierarchy should be Abolished

This short work outlines the current state of society, the structure of that state, and the dialectic of hierarchy and anti-hierarchy and the conclusion of said dialectic.

 

When you look at society today, what do you see? You see workers and business owners, citizens and policepeople, policepeople and commanders, citizens and government, soldiers and officers, agents and agencies, renters and property owners, users and intellectual property owners, and so on. How did these relationships materialise? Quite simply, "primitive communism" led to warring tribes, with territories expanding, and stronger members of tribes oppressing others. Following the invention of farming and stronger weaponry, these tribes had a revolution, with the creation of the hierarchy of feudalism. The king ruled supreme, with the knights and lords and peasants all in hierarchical subordination. After a while, the bourgeoisie toppled the feudal hierarchies of the world creating their own hierarchy - haute bourgeoisie, state, petty bourgeoisie, proletarian. This bourgeois hierarchy has been in effect for roughly 200 years and continues in this class subordination.

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